Tuesday, May 23, 2017

21 Anti-Aging Herbs and Nutrients


If you would like to look and feel younger, there are some herbs and nutrients that just may help you do that.

1. Alpha Lipoic Acid (ALA): ALA is a powerful antioxidant that helps protect your body from free radical damage. It also helps to recycle other antioxidants like vitamins E and C, giving you greater protection against free radicals. Free radicals are to blame for aging and disease, including skin damage and wrinkling.

2. Bilberry: Packed with antioxidants, bilberry is potent medicine against many age-related concerns. It is helpful to preserve vision and prevent degenerative eye diseases.

3. GABA (Gamma-aminobutyric acid): Declining levels of HGH are linked with many of the symptoms linked with aging: fat gain, muscle loss, loss of energy, poor sleep, skin changes, bone density loss, and a decline in libido. Supplementing with GABA, a natural amino acid helps to maintain levels of HGH naturally, lessening these unwanted symptoms. Avoid GABA if you are prone to seizures.

4. Garlic (Allium sativum): Garlic is renowned for its potent effects on viruses and bacteria, but it also reduces cholesterol levels and helps lower blood pressure. In one Japanese study, garlic slowed age-related memory loss in animals.

5. Ginkgo (Ginkgo biloba): There is solid scientific research that supports the use of ginkgo to increase blood flow to the brain, one of the areas that is commonly affected by aging. European research shows ginkgo’s capacity to help people with Alzheimer’s disease and other forms of dementia to become more sociable and alert. You can take 60 to 240 mg of standardized ginkgo extract per day.

6. Ginseng (Panax ginseng): Among the Chinese, ginseng is considered the Fountain of Youth. According to renowned herbalist Dr. James Duke, it tones the skin and muscles, improves appetite and digestion, and restores sexual energy.

7. Gotu Kola (Centella asiatica): Frequently used in India to improve memory and extend longevity, gotu kola is excellent when made into an herbal tea.

8. Horsetail (Equisetum arvense): Loaded with the mineral silicon that often declines with age, horsetail plays a role in increasing the silicon in arteries, skin, bones, cartilage and connective tissues. Horsetail is also available as a tea.

9. Milk Thistle (Silybum marianum): Since the liver has more than five hundred functions, including processing and filtering medications and environmental toxins, it can suffer from the stresses of the modern world. Silymarin, an active ingredient in milk thistle stimulates liver cell regeneration to help the liver rebuild after it has been damaged. A standardized extract of 140 mg of silymarin per day is suitable to help protect and repair the liver.

10. Peppermint (Metha peperita): In addition to helping with digestion and gastrointestinal problems linked with aging, peppermint contains antioxidants that help prevent cancer, heart disease, and other age-related disorders. It is readily available as an herbal tea.

11. Turmeric (curcuma longa): Turmeric is powerful against many types of pain and inflammation associated with aging. A spice, commonly used in Indian curries, you can add it to your soups, stews, and curries to benefit from this valuable spice.

12. Frankincense: This herb is often used to fight arthritis. Components of this herbaceous plant are frequently used in numerous anti-aging formulas.

13. Rosemary: The rosemary herb contains numerous active compounds that have displayed powerful anti inflammatory, anti oxidant, and tyrosinase-restraining properties. One such compound, carnosic acid, is potentially neuroprotective. What this means is that it protects the brain cells from free radical damage, which is often seen in things like Parkinson’s and Alzheimer’s diseases.

14. Licorice Root: This herbaceous plant includes anti inflammatory and anti oxidant properties. Additionally, it has been proven to guard your skin against harmful ultraviolet rays. Licorice’s active pharmaceutical ingredients contain glycyrrhizin, glycyrrhetinic acid, liquiritins, and more.

15. Neem: This herbaceous plant is highly valued for the way it can restrain bugs and bacteria. Seen to possess hypoglycemic, anti-malarial, and wound-healing properties, neem is also established to have strong free-radical inhibiting and anti oxidant properties.

16. Fenugreek: this is a common kitchen herb. This herb contains vitamin B3 that is instrumental in recovering damaged skin cells. In addition, it contains niacin, which helps in lightening ageing spots and reducing wrinkles that form on the corner of the eyes and lips.

17. Aloe Vera: it is among the most effective herbs for the skin. It is a natural remedy that deals with acne and pimples. Furthermore, it reduces skin wrinkles and increases the youthfulness of the skin. In addition, it improves the elasticity of the skin. 

18. Mullein: it is a herb that is quite beneficial in skin care. It plays a major role in tightening the skin. It acts by increasing circulation within the skin. It also prevents stretch marks and treats scars that occur on the skin. Mullein is considered to be a natural wrinkle fighter since it contains minerals and important vitamins.

19. Witch hazel: it is an effective skin tightening herb that contains some of the most powerful antioxidant properties. This alcohol free witch hazel with aloe vera helps in promoting healing properties as well as reducing skin wrinkles. In the end, it acts by enhancing the quality of the skin glow.

20. Thyme and basil: are well known for helping with skin issues. If you are trying to deal with wrinkles, skin sagging or age spots these two anti aging herbs may be of immense benefit to you.

21. Vitamin D: vitamin D helps protect against bone loss linked with aging, as well as many chronic illnesses like diabetes, cancer, and heart disease. Staying free of these diseases can certainly help you live a longer, healthier life.


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Monday, May 22, 2017

Traffic pollution linked to DNA damage - children are more vulnerable


Children and teenagers exposed to high levels of traffic pollution were found to show signs of premature aging, according to new study. 

Researchers in California also found youngsters with asthma had higher levels of a pollutant caused by motor vehicle exhaust. Those with higher levels had a specific type of DNA damage called telomere shortening - the main cause of age-related break down of our cells.

Telomeres are vital to our health - they can be described as the caps at the end of each strand of DNA that protect our chromosomes, like the plastic tips at the end of shoelaces.

'Children may be especially vulnerable to the effects of telomeric DNA damage due to their physical development as well as developing immune system,' wrote Dr John Balmes from the University of California, Berkeley, and his colleagues who carried out the study published in the Journal of Occupational and Environmental Medicine.

We already know how harmful outdoor air pollution is - it is responsible for about 3.7 million deaths a year according to the World Health Organization. 

Many previous studies have demonstrated that exposure is associated with heart and lung diseases - such as asthma, lung cancer, ischemic heart disease, and stroke. Despite this mounting evidence, the exact underlying mechanisms by which air pollutants cause this is not clear, the authors note. The new preliminary study suggests telomeres may be the key to understanding how pollution exposure leads to adverse health outcomes. 

The study analyzed 14 children and adolescents living in Fresno, California - the second-most polluted city in the US.

The researchers assessed the relationship between an 'ubiquitous' motor vehicle exhaust air pollutant called polycyclic aromatic hydrocarbons (PAHs), and shortening of telomeres.

As the exposure to PAHs increased, telomere length decreased. Children and teenagers with asthma were exposed to higher PAH levels than those without asthma.

The relationship between PAH level and telomere shortening remained significant after adjustments for asthma and other factors (age, sex, and race/ethnicity) weer made. 

Previous studies suggest that telomere length is linked to progression in chronic obstructive pulmonary disease (COPD). 

It also suggests that children may have 'different telomere shortening regulation than adults' - which might make them more vulnerable to the damaging effects of air pollution.  

The authors wrote, 'Our results suggest that telomere length may have potential for use as a biomarker of DNA damage due to environmental exposures and/or chronic inflammation.

'Greater knowledge of the impact of air pollution at the molecular level is necessary to design effective interventions and policies.' 

Telomeres are shortened as we age, but telomeres can also be shortened by stress, smoking, obesity, lack of exercise and a poor diet, previous research has shown. 



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Thursday, May 11, 2017

Just 30 minutes of jogging a day could add 9 YEARS to your lifespan


Just 30 minutes of jogging a day for five days a week could extend your lifespan by up to 10 years, a new study claims.

New research shows that those who exercise regularly can slow down the aging of cells.

The workouts have to be high intensity for the effect to be strong enough, researchers say.

Experts at Brigham Young University determined there was a difference of nine and seven years at a cellular level between those who did intense workouts on a regular basis compared to those who did moderate exercises.

Women, they found, need to jog for up to 30 minutes a day for five days a week in order to slow down cell aging. For men, it's 40 minutes.

It could even stave off the onset of wrinkles and graying hair. 

For young people, cells throughout the body are strong which translates into smooth and firm skin, shiny, full hair and lots of energy.

As the years pass, the strength of cells diminishes and they suffer breakage. Outwardly this is shown through wrinkles, grey hair and visible veins.  

Exercise science professor Larry Tucker said: 'Just because you're 40, doesn't mean you're 40 years old biologically.

'We all know people that seem younger than their actual age. The more physically active we are, the less biological aging takes place in our bodies.'

The research found those who trained in high volumes compared to those who didn't or those who exercised less frequently had much longer telomeres, which are the protein endcaps of chromosomes.

The length of telomeres have a strong correlation with a person's age and over time the endcaps get shorter and shorter.

The longer the telomeres, the more they protect DNA from 'fraying' and succumbing to disease. And the longer the telomeres, means for looking and feeling more youthful.  

Telomeres serve as a guide as what causes aging and how much cells can renew. Cell renewal keeps tissues young and healthy.

For some, exercise may not work to slow down the hands of time.

Researchers from the University of California in Los Angeles claimed that some people are destined to die earlier, no matter their levels of physical activity or their lifestyle. 

Through the study, they found five percent of people are genetically programmed to age faster and die younger than others. 

Race may be another component on how cells age. 

Latinos age slower than any other ethnicity according to researchers at UCLA.

They claim the group is unequivocally healthier due to cells taking much longer to age.

According to the Centers for Disease Control and Prevention, Latinos in the United States live an average of three years longer than Caucasians, with a life expectancy of 82 versus 79. 

Physical activity has been linked to several other benefits which could increase lifespans.

Tucker said: 'We know that regular physical activity helps to reduce mortality and prolong life, and now we know part of that advantage may be due to the preservation of telomeres.'

Exercise has been found to ward off obesity and limit the risk of cardiovascular disease. 

Despite the benefits of working out, statistics on regular physical activity in the nation are bleak; only about 20 percent of Americans get enough exercise and about 64 percent never do any physical activity at all. 



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Thursday, April 20, 2017

Do you want a 'younger' brain? Drink beetroot juice before exercising


Combining the drink with exercise strengthens certain regions of the brain, making it appear more youthful and potentially preventing the organ's decline.

This finding could help people who are at risk of brain deterioration to remain functionally independent, such as those with a family history of dementia.

Beetroot juice's power likely lies in its nitric oxide content, which both increases blood flow to the brain and improves exercise performance. 

Study author Professor Jack Rejeski, said: 'Nitric oxide is a really powerful molecule. It goes to the areas of the body which are hypoxic, or needing oxygen, and the brain is a heavy feeder of oxygen in your body.

'Compared to exercise alone, adding a beetroot juice supplement to exercise resulted in brain connectivity that closely resembles what you see in younger adults.'

Scientists from Wake Forest University, North Carolina, studied 26 men and women aged 55 and older who did not exercise and had high blood pressure.

Some participants were given beetroot juice one hour before walking for 50 minutes on a treadmill, while others did the same exercise but without the drink. This was repeated three times a week for six weeks.

Those who drank the juice had healthier brains, including the regions involved in movement, emotion and cognitive function.

The scientists also found higher levels of nitrate and nitrite in those who drank the juice. 

Beetroot contains nitrate, which is first converted to nitrite and then nitric oxide in the body. 

This comes after researchers from Queen Mary University of London found one daily glass of 250ml beetroot juice substantially lowers blood pressure.


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Monday, April 17, 2017

Just 4 minutes of intense cycling can stop cells from aging quickly, study reveals


High-intensity interval training for just four minutes at a time can stop the aging process.

Short bursts of super-intense exercise, used in spinning classes, have been found to reverse damage to cells which decline with age.

Many people may think long bike rides are the best exercise, or at least a half-hour session pedaling at the gym. But a US study found just four minutes of all-out cycling, followed by three easier minutes, are needed 12 times a week, along with another 90 minutes walking on a treadmill.

High intensity interval training, as it is known, works better than longer cycling sessions and weightlifting to halt the damage to the cells' 'batteries' which may kickstart the aging process.

Fixing defects in the DNA of these batteries, the mitochondria, is believed to help people live longer before falling ill with diseases of old age like heart failure and cancer.

Researchers at the Mayo Clinic in Minnesota found short bursts of exercise improve fitness, cut body fat and can ward off diabetes, as well as tackling cell aging.

They signed up 72 men and women aged 18 to 30 and 65 to 80 for high-intensity training, resistance training using weights, and combined training with longer bouts of cycling and fewer weights sessions.

In good news for time-poor office workers, senior author Dr Sreekumaran Nair, concluded the short bursts were the best.

He said: 'Based on everything we know, there's no substitute for these exercise programs when it comes to delaying the aging process. These things we are seeing cannot be done by any medicine.'

High intensity interval training works to burn more fat by producing 'excess post-oxygen consumption'. Four minutes cycling at close to maximum effort, before collapsing red-faced on the handlebars, leaves someone's resting metabolic rate elevated for longer after exercise.

The latest study shows it also works particularly well in causing cells to make more proteins for their energy-producing mitochondria. This ability is lost as people grow older.

The study, published in the journal Cell Metabolism, took biopsies from the participants' thigh muscles and compared the molecular makeup of their muscle cells to samples from sedentary volunteers.

The younger volunteers in the interval training group saw a 49 percent increase in their mitochondrial capacity, and the older volunteers saw an even more dramatic 69 percent increase.

Some of these reversed the decline in mitochondria caused by age, and the decline in proteins needed for muscle-building, which makes people increasingly frail as they get older.

These people did four minutes of high-intensity cycling, followed by three minutes of easier pedaling with no load, repeated only four times. The cycling sessions, on three days of the week, were coupled with two 45-minutes walks at a lower intensity on a treadmill.

It was better for aging than resistance training, involving lower and upper body weightlifting repeated eight to 12 times on four occasions twice a week. It also beat five days a week of cycling for half an hour at a lower intensity, plus four days of weightlifting with fewer repetitions.

However, interval training was less effective at improving muscle strength, which typically declines with aging.

Dr Nair, whose participants did not regularly exercise before joining the study, said: 'If people have to pick one exercise, I would recommend high-intensity interval training, but I think it would be more beneficial if they could do three to four days of interval training and then a couple days of strength training.'

The team hope a drug could be developed to mimic the effects of exercise in warding off old age. 



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Wednesday, April 12, 2017

Every hour you run adds 7 hours to your lifespan


Every hour you run extends your life span by seven hours - no matter how slow you go, a new study has revealed.

Scientists say that running just one hour a week is the most effective exercise to increase life expectancy. This holds true no matter how many miles or how fast you run, the researchers claim.

For those that take this advice to heart and run regularly, they say you can extend your life span by up to three years.

The study, conducted at Iowa State University, reanalyzed data from The Cooper Institute, in Texas, and also examined results from a number of other recent studies that looked at the link between exercise and mortality.

Scientists found that the new review reinforced the findings of earlier research.

At whatever pace or mileage, a person's risk of premature death dropped by 40 percent when he or she took up running.

This applied even when researchers controlled for smoking, drinking or a history of health problems such as obesity.

Three years ago, the same team conducted a study that analyzed more than 55,000 adults, and determined that running for just seven minutes a day could help slash the risk of dying from heart disease.

They followed participants over a period of 15 years, and found that of the more than 3,000 who died, only one-third of deaths were from heart disease.

Co-author Dr Duck-chul Lee, a professor of kinesiology at Iowa State University, told The New York Times that after this study was released, the team was hounded with questions wondering if other activities, such as walking, were as beneficial.

High-mileage runners also questioned if they were overperforming and if, at some point, running would actually contribute to premature mortality.

After analyzing the data in the new study, scientists determined that hour for hour, running statistically returns more time to people's lives than it consumes.

In The Cooper Institute study, participants reported an average of two hours running per week. 

The amount ran over the course of 40 years would add up to fewer than six months, but it could increase life expectancy by more than three years.

The researchers also determined that if every non-runner who had been part of the reviewed studies took up the sport, there would have been 16 percent fewer deaths over all, and 25 percent fewer fatal heart attacks. 

Other types of exercise were also found to be beneficial. Walking and cycling dropped the risk of premature death by about 12 percent. 

Dr Lee says scientists remain uncertain as to why running helps with longevity. But he says it's likely because the sport combats many common risk factors for early death, including high blood pressure and extra body fat, especially around the middle. It also raises aerobic fitness, one of the best-known indicators for long-term health.

Running, however, does not make you immortal and the life expectancy rates don't increase beyond three years.

Improvements in life expectancy generally plateaued at about four hours of running per week, Dr Lee said. But they did not decline.  


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Monday, April 10, 2017

The super trio: How olive oil, nuts and avocado can help you live forever


The magic potion for a long and healthy life could be in your cupboard - in the form of olive oil. A form of fat found in the staple kitchen ingredient may help people to reach 100 years old, scientists claim.

Animals given the healthy compound, which is also found in avocado and nuts, were found to live longer. Experts believe the findings may also be relevant to humans as we apparently share similar qualities with the animals.

Stanford University School of Medicine researchers believe the fat helps to protect cells from the signs of aging. They also said it allows the body to quickly access energy from foods in the study published in the journal Nature.

Lead author Professor Anne Brunet said: 'We have known for some time metabolic changes can affect lifespan, but we expected the long-lived animals in our study would be thinner.

'Instead, they turned out to be fatter. This was quite a surprise.'

It may also explain why southern Europeans, who frequently eat olive oil in their Mediterranean diet, live longer and have lower rates of heart disease, despite consuming more fat.

In the study, roundworms were fed mono-unsaturated fatty acids, which are already known to reduce the risk of heart disease and diabetes.

Not only did the roundworms become obese, but they also lived two days longer on average than their svelte counterparts. Their average lifespan is a fortnight.

Research has previously shown roundworms that lack a complex of proteins called COMPASS live for 30 per cent longer than their peers. 

Tests later found blocking COMPASS helped convert unhealthy polyunsaturated fats in the animals' guts into mono-unsaturated fats. This came as a surprise as severe calorie restriction has also been shown to extend the lifespan of worms and many other animals.

The researchers are now working to understand how the mono-unsaturated fatty acid accumulation might work to extend lifespan.

Humans with diets rich in mono-unsaturated fats have been shown to have a reduced risk for heart disease and diabetes.

Some studies have even shown that centenarians store more mono-unsaturated fat than non-centenarians. 

Commenting on the study, London-based nutritionist Rob Hobson said 'it has many health benefits' mainly supporting the heart.

Healthspan's head of nutrition added: 'It contains unique anti oxidants that reduce inflammation such as oleocanthal.

'Like all healthy foods it’s energy dense so by that although good for you you still need to eat in moderation.' 


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